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Aktuelle Version von: Dan ,

Text:

A CRT can hold several THOUSAND volts of electricity in its flyback circuitry. If you do not have the necessary experience and tools to properly discharge and make safe a CRT, you should not even take the plastic cover off. There is also the chance of physically damaging the fragile neck of the CRT, leading to a violent implosion as the vacuum is released. This could spray poisonous, phosphor-covered shards of glass all over the room.
 
Mac Geniuses must pass the CRT safety section of the certification exam with a 100% score every year - it's that serious of a safety issue.
 
Also, don't think a CRT which has been powered off for a long period of time will be safe - the CRT will slowly continue to build static electricity just due to the Earth's rotation and magnetic fields.
 
Peachpit Press has an excellent excerpt from its Training Series books discussing CRT safety here:
 
http://www.peachpit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=759704&seqNum=2
 
 
Servicing a CRT-based Macintosh should be left to the professionals due to the inherent dangers. I avoid them as much as possible, even though I am thoroughly trained, with decades of experience working on CRT-based computers, monitors, and test equipment.
 
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Status:

open

Bearbeitet von: Miroslav Djuric ,

Text:

A CRT can hold several THOUSAND volts of electricity in its flyback circuitry. If you do not have the necessary experience and tools to properly discharge and make safe a CRT, you should not even take the plastic cover off. There is also the chance of physically damaging the fragile neck of the CRT, leading to a violent implosion as the vacuum is released. This could spray poisonous, phosphor-covered shards of glass all over the room.
 
Mac Geniuses must pass the CRT safety section of the certification exam with a 100% score every year - it's that serious of a safety issue.
 
Also, don't think a CRT which has been powered off for a long period of time will be safe - the CRT will slowly continue to build static electricity just due to the Earth's rotation and magnetic fields.
 
Peachpit Press has an excellent excerpt from its Training Series books discussing CRT safety here:
 
http://www.peachpit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=759704&seqNum=2
 
 
Servicing a CRT-based Macintosh should be left to the professionals due to the inherent dangers. I avoid them as much as possible, even though I am throughlythoroughly trained, with decades of experience working on CRT-based computers, monitors, and test equipment.
Servicing a CRT-based Macintosh should be left to the professionals due to the inherent dangers. I avoid them as much as possible, even though I am throughlythoroughly trained, with decades of experience working on CRT-based computers, monitors, and test equipment.

Status:

open

Ursprünglicher Beitrag von: David Iwanicki ,

Text:

A CRT can hold several THOUSAND volts of electricity in its flyback circuitry. If you do not have the necessary experience and tools to properly discharge and make safe a CRT, you should not even take the plastic cover off. There is also the chance of physically damaging the fragile neck of the CRT, leading to a violent implosion as the vacuum is released. This could spray poisonous, phosphor-covered shards of glass all over the room.

Mac Geniuses must pass the CRT safety section of the certification exam with a 100% score every year - it's that serious of a safety issue.

Also, don't think a CRT which has been powered off for a long period of time will be safe - the CRT will slowly continue to build static electricity just due to the Earth's rotation and magnetic fields.

Peachpit Press has an excellent excerpt from its Training Series books discussing CRT safety here:

http://www.peachpit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=759704&seqNum=2


Servicing a CRT-based Macintosh should be left to the professionals due to the inherent dangers. I avoid them as much as possible, even though I am throughly trained, with decades of experience working on CRT-based computers, monitors, and test equipment.

Status:

open