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Aktuelle Version von: Luke Soules ,

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Unfortunately, opening a hard drive without a clean room probably isn't going to solve your issue. If the hard drive is clicking, it's most likely an issue with the drive's actuator arm. Some people have had success giving the drive a mild shock to free the arm, but If you're resorting to that I wouldn't trust the drive for anything important in the future.

On some drives, you can replace the controller board without opening the drive. In 1.8" drives, Samsung drives are designed this way. Unfortunately, if you have an iPod Video, it likely has a Toshiba drive, meaning the controller board is integrated into the drive and can't be removed or changed without opening up the drive.

If the drive's dead and you've never seen the insides of a drive, it's fun to take a look at the platter and arm inside the drive. Most 1.8 drives are held together with small Torx screws. Unfortunately, if you have a Toshiba drive they use a 5-pointed Torx bit instead of the normal 6-pointed Torx bit. The bad news is that this screw type is patented (and the patent hasn't expired yet), so it's really hard to get the correct screwdriver to remove these screws. You can often use a very small flat-head screwdriver to get them out. Samsung is nicer here too, Samsung 1.8" drives are held together with normal T3 Torx screws.
Unfortunately, opening a hard drive without a clean room probably isn't going to solve your issue. If the hard drive is clicking, it's most likely an issue with the drive's actuator arm. Some people have had success giving the drive a mild shock to free the arm, but If you're resorting to that I wouldn't trust the drive for anything important in the future.

On some drives, you can replace the controller board without opening the drive. In 1.8" drives, Samsung drives are designed this way. Unfortunately, if you have an iPod Video, it likely has a Toshiba drive, meaning the controller board is integrated into the drive and can't be removed or changed without opening up the drive.

If the drive's dead and you've never seen the insides of a drive, it's fun to take a look at the platter and arm inside the drive. Most 1.8 drives are held together with small Torx screws. Unfortunately, if you have a Toshiba drive they use a 5-pointed Torx bit instead of the normal 6-pointed Torx bit. The bad news is that this screw type is patented (and the patent hasn't expired yet), so it's really hard to get the correct screwdriver to remove these screws. You can often use a very small flat-head screwdriver to get them out. Samsung is nicer here too, Samsung 1.8" drives are held together with normal T3 Torx screws.

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open

Ursprünglicher Beitrag von: Luke Soules ,

Text:

Unfortunately, opening a hard drive without a clean room probably isn't going to solve your issue.

Status:

open