Zum Hauptinhalt wechseln
Hilfe

Aktuelle Version von: Dan ,

Text:

@mayer - Not sure it's something I would go with.
* It's limited to SATA 6.0 Gb/s systems. Unlike the older SSHD drives which auto set to the systems SATA port. So it's a bit limited on which systems it will play in.
* The NAND is small than the drive I've been putting in the MacBook Pro's (Seagate ST1000LX001) which has 32GB unlike the FireCUDA which only has 8 GB.
It does appear to have a denser platters and run faster which gives it a bit faster read/write times. It's the same as the older SSHD with 8 GB of Flash but twice as dense (1 TB Vs 2 TB). Looking at the power the idle load is less and of course the case is now 7 mm Vs 9.5 mm which would allow it to be a good choice for the older Mac Mini's (SATA III models).
-So far we are still able to get the older drive but I'm sure it will be phased out (our needs have also diminished for HD's). In the meantime we've been moving forward with upgrading to SSD's so that just might push us a little sooner.
+So far we are still able to get the older drive but I'm sure it will be phased out (our needs have also diminished for HD's in system upgrades). In the meantime we've been moving forward with upgrading to SSD's so that just might push us a little sooner.

Status:

open

Bearbeitet von: Dan ,

Text:

@mayer - Not sure it's something I would go with.
* It's limited to SATA 6.0 Gb/s systems. Unlike the older SSHD drives which auto set to the systems SATA port. So it's a bit limited on which systems it will play in.
* The NAND is small than the drive I've been putting in the MacBook Pro's (Seagate ST1000LX001) which has 32GB unlike the FireCUDA which only has 8 GB.
-It does appear to have a denser platters which gives it a bit faster read/write times. It's the same as the older SSHD with 8 GB of Flash but twice as dense (1 TB Vs 2 TB). Looking at the power the idle load is less and of course the case is now 7 mm Vs 9.5 mm which would allow it to be a good choice for the older Mac Mini's.
+It does appear to have a denser platters and run faster which gives it a bit faster read/write times. It's the same as the older SSHD with 8 GB of Flash but twice as dense (1 TB Vs 2 TB). Looking at the power the idle load is less and of course the case is now 7 mm Vs 9.5 mm which would allow it to be a good choice for the older Mac Mini's (SATA III models).
So far we are still able to get the older drive but I'm sure it will be phased out (our needs have also diminished for HD's). In the meantime we've been moving forward with upgrading to SSD's so that just might push us a little sooner.

Status:

open

Bearbeitet von: Dan ,

Text:

@mayer - Not sure it's something I would go with.
* It's limited to SATA 6.0 Gb/s systems. Unlike the older SSHD drives which auto set to the systems SATA port. So it's a bit limited on which systems it will play in.
-* The NAND is small than the drive I've been putting in the MacBook Pro's (Seagate ST1000LX001) which has 32GB The FireCUDA only has 8 GB.
+* The NAND is small than the drive I've been putting in the MacBook Pro's (Seagate ST1000LX001) which has 32GB unlike the FireCUDA which only has 8 GB.
It does appear to have a denser platters which gives it a bit faster read/write times. It's the same as the older SSHD with 8 GB of Flash but twice as dense (1 TB Vs 2 TB). Looking at the power the idle load is less and of course the case is now 7 mm Vs 9.5 mm which would allow it to be a good choice for the older Mac Mini's.
So far we are still able to get the older drive but I'm sure it will be phased out (our needs have also diminished for HD's). In the meantime we've been moving forward with upgrading to SSD's so that just might push us a little sooner.

Status:

open

Bearbeitet von: Dan ,

Text:

@mayer - Not sure it's something I would go with.
* It's limited to SATA 6.0 Gb/s systems. Unlike the older SSHD drives which auto set to the systems SATA port. So it's a bit limited on which systems it will play in.
-* The NAND is small than the drive I've been putting in the MacBook Pro's Seagate ST1000LX001 which has 32GB The FireCUDA only has 8 GB.
+* The NAND is small than the drive I've been putting in the MacBook Pro's (Seagate ST1000LX001) which has 32GB The FireCUDA only has 8 GB.
It does appear to have a denser platters which gives it a bit faster read/write times. It's the same as the older SSHD with 8 GB of Flash but twice as dense (1 TB Vs 2 TB). Looking at the power the idle load is less and of course the case is now 7 mm Vs 9.5 mm which would allow it to be a good choice for the older Mac Mini's.
So far we are still able to get the older drive but I'm sure it will be phased out (our needs have also diminished for HD's). In the meantime we've been moving forward with upgrading to SSD's so that just might push us a little sooner.

Status:

open

Ursprünglicher Beitrag von: Dan ,

Text:

@mayer - Not sure it's something I would go with.

* It's limited to SATA 6.0 Gb/s systems. Unlike the older SSHD drives which auto set to the systems SATA port. So it's a bit limited on which systems it will play in.
* The NAND is small than the drive I've been putting in the MacBook Pro's Seagate ST1000LX001 which has 32GB The FireCUDA only has 8 GB.

It does appear to have a denser platters which gives it a bit faster read/write times. It's the same as the older SSHD with 8 GB of Flash but twice as dense (1 TB Vs 2 TB). Looking at the power the idle load is less and of course the case is now 7 mm Vs 9.5 mm which would allow it to be a good choice for the older Mac Mini's.

So far we are still able to get the older drive but I'm sure it will be phased out (our needs have also diminished for HD's). In the meantime we've been moving forward with upgrading to SSD's so that just might push us a little sooner.

Status:

open