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Aktuelle Version von: Nick ,

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-Power supply failures in HP desktops are fairly common, since the OEM unit HP uses is cheaply built. I suspect the power supply (likely OEM) failed due to bad capacitors or another failure; that said it isn't worth repairing. The best advice I can give you is to NOT buy another HP unit to replace the bad one; find a nice 3rd party unit.
+Power supply failures in HP desktops are fairly common, since the OEM unit HP has used for the past ~5 years is cheaply built. I suspect the OEM power supply failed. Replace it rather then trying to repair the old one, since the cost of a replacement is cheaper. DO NOT buy another HP unit; it'll have the same problem. Find a nice one from a reputable vendor like Corsair or Seasonic.
Since HP loves Torx T10, you will need one of these to get the unit out initially. However, many power supplies come with common Phillips #2 screws, which I'd recommend using if you get them; don't waste your time with the annoying HP screws. The other problem is depending on if the power supply you buy has dual hole mounts drilled into the case, you may not be able to use 4 screws BUT should be able to get most of them installed. While [https://www.amazon.com/Corsair-Bronze-Certified-Non-Modular-CP-9020121-NA/dp/B01MRW2K79/|this power supply (Corsair CX550)] doesn't have 2 drill points for the last screw that's prone to problems in OEM systems, it's a good inexpensive replacement power supply.

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Bearbeitet von: Nick ,

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-Power supply failures in HP desktops are fairly common, since the OEM unit is so cheap. I suspect bad capacitors or another failure in the HP OEM unit. The best advice I can give you is to NOT buy another HP unit to replace the bad one; find a nice 3rd party unit.
+Power supply failures in HP desktops are fairly common, since the OEM unit HP uses is cheaply built. I suspect the power supply (likely OEM) failed due to bad capacitors or another failure; that said it isn't worth repairing. The best advice I can give you is to NOT buy another HP unit to replace the bad one; find a nice 3rd party unit.
-Since HP loves Torx T10, you will need one of these to get the unit out initially. However, many power supplies come with common Phillips #2 screws, which I'd recommend using if you get them; don't waste your time with the annoying HP screws. The other problem is depending on if the power supply you buy has dual hole mounts drilled into the case, you may not be able to use 4 screws BUT should be able to get most of them installed. While [https://www.amazon.com/Corsair-Bronze-Certified-Non-Modular-CP-9020121-NA/dp/B01MRW2K79/|this power supply (Corsair CX550)] doesn't have 2 drill points for the last screw that's prone to problems in OEM systems, it's a good quality unit that is inexpensive.
+Since HP loves Torx T10, you will need one of these to get the unit out initially. However, many power supplies come with common Phillips #2 screws, which I'd recommend using if you get them; don't waste your time with the annoying HP screws. The other problem is depending on if the power supply you buy has dual hole mounts drilled into the case, you may not be able to use 4 screws BUT should be able to get most of them installed. While [https://www.amazon.com/Corsair-Bronze-Certified-Non-Modular-CP-9020121-NA/dp/B01MRW2K79/|this power supply (Corsair CX550)] doesn't have 2 drill points for the last screw that's prone to problems in OEM systems, it's a good inexpensive replacement power supply.

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Ursprünglicher Beitrag von: Nick ,

Text:

Power supply failures in HP desktops are fairly common, since the OEM unit is so cheap. I suspect bad capacitors or another failure in the HP OEM unit. The best advice I can give you is to NOT buy another HP unit to replace the bad one; find a nice 3rd party unit.

Since HP loves Torx T10, you will need one of these to get the unit out initially. However, many power supplies come with common Phillips #2 screws, which I'd recommend using if you get them; don't waste your time with the annoying HP screws. The other problem is depending on if the power supply you buy has dual hole mounts drilled into the case, you may not be able to use 4 screws BUT should be able to get most of them installed. While [https://www.amazon.com/Corsair-Bronze-Certified-Non-Modular-CP-9020121-NA/dp/B01MRW2K79/|this power supply (Corsair CX550)] doesn't have 2 drill points for the last screw that's prone to problems in OEM systems, it's a good quality unit that is inexpensive.

Status:

open