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Aktuelle Version von: Tom Chai ,

Text:

I believe you are looking at the Xbox Wireless module instead of the generic WiFi module.
 
Xbox Wireless is a custom protocol, based on some 2.4G 802.11 variant. It’s not supposed to be visible to any other non-Xbox accessory devices. It is OK to use WEP encapsulation because data carried over it either has additional encryption, or not important anyway. I doubt it is even real WEP, it is supposed to be a custom protocol, maybe your sniffer misidentified it. It will start to work as soon as the device is powered upconnected to power because it needs to listen to wireless controller command for power on
Xbox Wireless is a custom protocol, based on some 2.4G 802.11 variant. It’s not supposed to be visible to any other non-Xbox accessory devices. It is OK to use WEP encapsulation because data carried over it either has additional encryption, or not important anyway. I doubt it is even real WEP, it is supposed to be a custom protocol, maybe your sniffer misidentified it. It will start to work as soon as the device is powered upconnected to power because it needs to listen to wireless controller command for power on
 
Also Xbox One has modern standby, meaning the system will keep the real WiFi alive during sleep power off, so the system can download stuff during standby or receive power-up requests via LAN. The real WiFi channel is modern and properly encrypted.

Status:

open

Bearbeitet von: Tom Chai ,

Text:

I believe you are looking at the Xbox Wireless module instead of the generic WiFi module.
 
Xbox Wireless module is a custom protocol, based on some 2.4G 802.11 variant. It’s not supposed to be visible to any other non-Xbox accessory devices. It is OK to use WEP encapsulation because data carried over it either has additional encryption, or not important anyway. I doubt it is even real WEP, it is supposed to be a custom protocol, maybe your sniffer misidentified it. It will start to work as soon as the device is powered up because it needs to listen to wireless controller command for power on
Xbox Wireless module is a custom protocol, based on some 2.4G 802.11 variant. It’s not supposed to be visible to any other non-Xbox accessory devices. It is OK to use WEP encapsulation because data carried over it either has additional encryption, or not important anyway. I doubt it is even real WEP, it is supposed to be a custom protocol, maybe your sniffer misidentified it. It will start to work as soon as the device is powered up because it needs to listen to wireless controller command for power on
 
Also Xbox One has modern standby, meaning the system will keep the real WiFi alive during sleep power off, so the system can download stuff during standby or receive power-up requests via LAN. The real WiFi channel is modern and properly encrypted.

Status:

open

Ursprünglicher Beitrag von: Tom Chai ,

Text:

I believe you are looking at the Xbox Wireless module instead of the generic WiFi module.

Xbox Wireless module is a custom protocol, based on some 2.4G 802.11 variant. It’s not supposed to be visible to any other non-Xbox accessory devices. It is OK to use WEP encapsulation because data carried over it either has additional encryption, or not important anyway. I doubt it is even real WEP, it is supposed to be a custom protocol, maybe your sniffer misidentified it. It will start to work as soon as the device is powered up because it needs to listen to wireless controller command for power on

Also Xbox One has modern standby, meaning the system will keep the real WiFi alive during sleep power off, so the system can download stuff during standby or receive power-up requests via LAN. The real WiFi channel is modern and properly encrypted.

Status:

open