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Aktuelle Version von: LadyTech ,

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The tests on this dishwasher CAN’T be done by checking voltage. The unit must be UNPLUGGED and all tests are done by measuring the ohms with a multimeter.
 
Troubleshootibg this would start with the float switch to ensure that it can manually be moved up and down and test the switch during moving it to see if the contacts open and close. If so, the next would be to check for a siphoning issue since you said this only happens towards the middle of the cycle. Since the d/w has filled several times so far, it’s possible that the home drain could be restricted and backing up after the d/w has filled and drained this many times. This would cause it to fill and drain at the same time and never allowing the d/w to hold the water needed to wash.
 
Not coukd alsoIt could also be the drain pump stuck in a constant drain position. You should be able to hold the drain hose to determine if it’s draining. If you can see or hear the water drawing into the disposal and at the same time it’s filling, then it’s not a plumbing siphoned problem problem because there is andIf you hear the water splashing in the disposal then it has an air break. You would want to check the drain pump for debris keeping it in a drain position.
Not coukd alsoIt could also be the drain pump stuck in a constant drain position. You should be able to hold the drain hose to determine if it’s draining. If you can see or hear the water drawing into the disposal and at the same time it’s filling, then it’s not a plumbing siphoned problem problem because there is andIf you hear the water splashing in the disposal then it has an air break. You would want to check the drain pump for debris keeping it in a drain position.
 
If it’s not filling at all, and the water inlet valve tests with ohms are good, it coukdcould still be an intermittent problem in the water inlet valve
If it’s not filling at all, and the water inlet valve tests with ohms are good, it coukdcould still be an intermittent problem in the water inlet valve
 
'''There is no voltage test to be done to check the water valve.''' Simply unplug d/w or turn off at the breaker box. Turn off the water at the cut off valve under your sink. Remove the kick plate at the bottom of the d/w to view the fill valve on the left. You can then disconnect the water line to the valve and remove the 1/4” screw securing the valve and remove the rubber fill hose from the valve.
 
The tricky part is flushing you water line. This is the lowest water line in your home and sediment will collect in it. It needs to be flushed out. You might need to pull your d/w out to do this. You need to be able to open the cutoff under the sink all the way to allow a few gallons of water to flush out the line. The water pressure should be at least 60psi, that’s a good, strong stream of water. Then you are ready to replace the water valve.
 
The reason for not testing the water valve for voltage is that this sediment will work it’s way inside the valve. There is a rubber diaphragm that the sediment will build up on and cause the diaphragm to stick. It can stick open and causingcause the water to constantly flow into d/w, flooding your house. Or, it will stick shut, not allowing water to flow at all. It’s usually intermittent at first. It sticks sometimes and other times it’s fine. A voltage test won’t show this. It would test good because your only able to test the motor windings and not the moving parts.
The reason for not testing the water valve for voltage is that this sediment will work it’s way inside the valve. There is a rubber diaphragm that the sediment will build up on and cause the diaphragm to stick. It can stick open and causingcause the water to constantly flow into d/w, flooding your house. Or, it will stick shut, not allowing water to flow at all. It’s usually intermittent at first. It sticks sometimes and other times it’s fine. A voltage test won’t show this. It would test good because your only able to test the motor windings and not the moving parts.
 
The door switch will not cause this problem and since you said your hearing the motor running and it runs through all the cycles without errorserror codes, then we know that it’s not an electrical issue. Error codes only show electric issues. More than likely, you have a failing water inlet valve.
The door switch will not cause this problem and since you said your hearing the motor running and it runs through all the cycles without errorserror codes, then we know that it’s not an electrical issue. Error codes only show electric issues. More than likely, you have a failing water inlet valve.

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Ursprünglicher Beitrag von: LadyTech ,

Text:

The tests on this dishwasher CAN’T be done by checking voltage. The unit must be UNPLUGGED and all tests are done by measuring the ohms with a multimeter.

Troubleshootibg this would start with the float switch to ensure that it can manually be moved up and down and test the switch during moving it to see if the contacts open and close. If so, the next would be to check for a siphoning issue since you said this only happens towards the middle of the cycle. Since the d/w has filled several times so far, it’s possible that the home drain could be restricted and backing up after the d/w has filled and drained this many times.  This would cause it to fill and drain at the same time and never allowing the d/w to hold the water needed to wash.

Not coukd also be the drain pump stuck in a constant drain position. You should be able to hold the drain hose to determine if it’s draining. If you can see or hear the water drawing into the disposal and at the same time it’s filling, then it’s not a plumbing siphoned problem because there is and air break. You would want to check the drain pump .

If it’s not filling at all, and the water inlet valve tests with ohms are good, it coukd still be an intermittent problem in the water inlet valve

'''There is no voltage test to be done to check the water valve.'''  Simply unplug d/w or turn off at the breaker box. Turn off the water at the cut off valve under your sink. Remove the kick plate at the bottom of the d/w to view the fill valve on the left. You can then disconnect the water line to the valve and remove the 1/4” screw securing the valve and remove the rubber fill hose from the valve.

The tricky part is flushing you water line. This is the lowest water line in your home and sediment will collect in it. It needs to be flushed out. You might need to pull your d/w out to do this. You need to be able to open the cutoff under the sink all the way to allow a few gallons of water to flush out the line. The water pressure should be at least 60psi, that’s a good, strong stream of water. Then you are ready to replace the water valve.

The reason for not testing the water valve for voltage is that this sediment will work it’s way inside the valve. There is a rubber diaphragm that the sediment will build up on and cause the diaphragm to stick. It can stick open and causing the water to constantly flow flooding your house. Or, it will stick shut, not allowing water to flow at all. It’s usually intermittent at first. It sticks sometimes and other times it’s fine. A voltage test won’t show this. It would test good because your only able to test the motor windings and not the moving parts.

The door switch will not cause this problem and since you said your hearing the motor running and it runs through all the cycles without errors, then we know that it’s not an electrical issue. More than likely, you have a failing water inlet valve.

Status:

open